Illustrated Architecture Dictionary

Colonnade(d)
col un AID

A series of columns in a straight line carrying an entablature

In Classical architecture, a long sequence of columns joined by their entablature, often freestanding

A row of columns, either surrounding a temple or standing as an independent architectural element

A series of columns placed at regular intervals.

A row of evenly spaced columns, usually supporting a roof or a set of arches.

Row of columns generally supporting an entablature, used either as an independent feature (e.g., a covered walkway) or as part of a building (e.g., a portico).

The earliest colonnades appear in the temple architecture of ancient Greece.

In a basilica [or church], colonnades are used to separate the side aisles from the central space.

- Britannica Concise Encyclopedia

In classical architecture, a colonnade denotes a long sequence of columns joined by their entablature, often free-standing, or part of a building.

When in front of a building, screening the door (Latin porta), it is called a portico, when enclosing an open court, a peristyle.

A portico may be more than one rank of columns deep, as at the Pantheon in Rome...

- Wikipedia (1/2011)

Portico: Colonnade standing before a building, supporting a roof, and serving as a porch

Peristyle: Colonnade surrounding a building or garden.

Tetrastyle: Four columns in a row
Hexastyle: Six columns in a row
Octastyle: Eight columns in a row
Decastyle: Ten columns in a row

Loggia: An arcaded or colonnaded porch or gallery attached to a larger structure

Found in classical Greek and Roman architecture and derivatives, including Beaux Arts Classicism, Federal, Georgian Revival, Greek Revival, Neoclassicism, Renaissance Revival, Second Empire


Examples from Buffalo architecture

Other examples:


Photos and their arrangement 2002 Chuck LaChiusa
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